DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition

DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition

L-R: Chris Harris (ACMI), Honor Harger (ArtScience Museum) and Doug Cooper (DreamWorks Animation)



L-R: Chris Harris (ACMI), Honor Harger (ArtScience Museum) and Doug Cooper (DreamWorks Animation) 

Ever wondered how your favourite animated movies like Madagascar, Shrek and How to Train Your Dragon are made?

Find out first hand when the DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition makes its first stop of its five-year international tour at the ArtScience Museum Singapore from 13 June 2015. Featuring 31 films and more than 400 displays, the exhibition provides a satisfying look into the creative processes from first sketch to the cinema screen in three sections: Character, Story and World.

There will be English guided tours, educational workshops and film screenings available at the exhibition.

The Maquette Parade: A display of almost 50 scale models before digitising on computers.



The Maquette Parade: A display of almost 50 scale models before digitising on computers.

The tour starts off in the Character section with the Maquette Parade, an awe-inspiring display of almost 50 maquettes (scale models) as well as video interviews with production teams. Previously, creating these characters began with sculpting scale models based on design sketches before these models were digitised. With evolving technology over the years, the sketches are now done directly on computers.

A collection of different sketches of Shrek (three columns on left side) and Puss in Boots (two columns on right).



A collection of different sketches of Shrek (three columns on left side) and Puss in Boots (two columns on right).

Highlights of Maquette Parade include the early looks of one of the most beloved DreamWorks Animation’s characters - Shrek, which never made it to screen.

“There is quite a wide variety of different ideas behind it. Yet when you look in there, you’ll find the heart of Shrek in every one of those [sketches]. A lot of that design process or planning a character is searching for that visual representation, the emotional core of that character. And we’ll find those pieces eventually, locking [them] down so we’ll find the character that is realised in the film,” explained Doug Cooper, Visual Effects Supervisor of DreamWorks Animation.





‘The brainstorming table’: Where story-makers gather to discuss ideas and make sketches.

In the Story section, visitors will get to know more about pitching and developing ideas, sketching scenes and writing dialogue. This is where the stories really start to take shape.

“The centre of this room is what we call 'the brainstorming table'. It's really the representation of a creative space that might be an office where story-makers would sit around. In this space, you can see storyboards being drawn and written notes exchanged, making little sketches and ideas on Post-it notes and passing them across the table, spilling their coffee and staying up 24 hours a day,” described Chris Harris, Senior Manager (Exhibitions and Touring) of Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI).

A cool insight into how visual effects impact the story.



A cool insight into how visual effects impact the story.

World is the largest and final section of the exhibition that features the transition from simple animations to films with complex visual effects, production design and concept art.

“This is meant to give you a sense of complexity and layering that go into creating one of the visual effects that you would see in the film. You can see all the different pieces that are layered together and composited to create that final effect,” said Cooper.





Be an animator for a day at the interactive stations.

Making the tour experience truly worthwhile are the interactive stations throughout the exhibition. The stations include Drawing Room, Face Pose, Ocean Simulator and Lighting Designer.

“Visitors get to be animators themselves in our Drawing Room exhibit, which allows [them] to get hands-on and create their own animations using the very software that the DreamWorks animators use in the studio,” said Honor Harger, Executive Director of ArtScience Museum.

What makes this even more exciting is the access to an actual DreamWorks Animation character animation timeline.

“When you're manipulating these characters, you're manipulating the real Po or the penguins of Madagascar. You can control individual parts of their face, their eyes, their mouth [and] their nose and all of these expressions come directly out of the library of expressions that our DreamWorks animators use,” highlighted Cooper.

Join the SAFRA Celebration Run & Ride 2015 and enjoy thrilling rides based off your favourite DreamWorks Animation films at Universal Studios Singapore! Don’t miss the Grand Lucky Draw!

Enjoy exclusive shopping deals for your running gear at Sports ConnectionSPORTSLINK ™ & AE storesReebok (including the ZPump Fushion promo), Royal Sporting House with their Mega Sports Warehouse Preview Sale and Great Sports SaleRunning Lab and Under Amour!


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