The Blurred Lines of War Photography

The Blurred Lines of War Photography





Photo sourced from nytimes.com

"When I photograph, what I'm really doing is seeking answers to things."

A quote from one of the 20th century's greatest American photographer Wynn Bullock accurately describes the job of this particular profession. The art behind capturing moments on film is constantly developing yet the intent stays the same. It is through photographs that we understand more clearly about the world outside the comforts of our own homes.

There are many styles of photography, some more dangerous than others. One such risky venture is war photography. Those in this particular line throw themselves into the midst of battle to take pictures of those directly affected by war. Their work more than serves their duty to inform the truth of what is happening to the rest of the world; they often show the vulnerable side of humanity. Pictures speak a thousand words and such photographs would no doubt speak volumes about a particular subject that would open up the minds of the viewers and hopefully their hearts too.

Check out some of the most shocking and emotional war photographs captured from all over the world. Be warned, some are truly graphic. Due to this, photographers are often criticized for allegedly doing nothing to help instead of taking pictures. What is less known is that they actually do have mixed feelings after taking such photographs. It is certainly not easy living like the next job might be their last and being in highly dangerous places armed with nothing but a camera.





Photo sourced from nytimes.com

Sharing this sentiment is renowned Australian photographer Adam Ferguson. Quoted from an interview he did with The Guardian, he “felt sad” when he won the World Press award for the photograph he did (pictured above). The woman’s reaction captured the overall mood of the suicide bombing incident in Afghanistan four years ago. "People were congratulating me and there was a celebration over this intense tragedy that I had captured. I reconciled it by deciding that more people see a story when a photographer's work is decorated."





Photo sourced from blogspot.com

Many photographers feel the same way as Adam who is a Griffith University graduate with a degree in photography. Since 2007, he has moved to Delhi and documented various events in South Asia including the social tensions in economically growing India. His award-winning works have been published by major magazine companies like Time and Vanity Fair. His works can also be found on his website and instagram (@adamfergusonphoto).





Photo sourced from nytimes.com

Adam has also worked in Iraq after the United States troops left the country and documented the effects of the American occupation. The picture above shows a family man at home in Baghdad who lost his arm during a suicide attack at the Iraqi police recruitment centre.

He certainly has interesting experiences traveling to places like Iraq and Afghanistan during such times. It may be very dangerous and even frowned upon to be a war photographer but one cannot deny the importance of their work. Whether or not these photographs leave you with a bad taste in your mouth, they continue to preserve significant moments in history as well as spread more awareness to the rest of the world.

To hear more stories from a professional war photographer, make sure to get tickets to see Adam Ferguson at the SAFRA photo convention called ‘All For Peace’ today. Besides that, visitors will also get to learn how to use Adobe’s photo editing program in the afternoon and leave with a goodie bag each. See you there!

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